Death: The Inherent Danger of Motorsports

‘I didn’t have a Plan B in life.’ I was in pursuit of my dream from the very beginning. It’s all about desire and passion. At all costs.- Mario Andretti

Anthoine Hubert succumbed to his injuries after a lap-two incident during the 17th round of the Formula 2 championship at Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium. The Frenchman was 22-years old. Juan-Manuel Correa and Giuliano Alesi were also involved in the incident.

Correa’s impact of Hubert happened at high-speed after cresting the uphill turn of Raidillon. Hubert’s car careened off the wall after trying to avoid Alesi and came back toward the racing line. Correa had no time to react to Hubert, and the impact split Hubert’s car in half as the monocoque separated from the chassis. According to an FIA statement, Correa was sent to Liege hospital “in stable condition.”

Giuliano Alesi was deemed fit at the track’s medical center.

The race was not resumed and the Formula 2 race for that following Sunday was canceled out of respect for Hubert and his family. The FIA is currently investigating the incident. Hubert’s passing is the first death due to an incident since Jules Bianchi succumbed to his injuries from the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix. Bianchi passed on the following July.

Racing is dangerous. Always has been and always will be.

I admit that as a current fan who has grown-up in arguably the safest time in motorsports, I tend to forget this. The advances in safety in the last 20 years have been incredible. Unfortunately, this is a sport that is continuously reactive instead of proactive when it comes to saftey. Notable required safety items like the HANS device, SAFER barriers, and HALO have all be a direct effect from death within the sport.

Often, this reaction happens after losing the sport’s biggest names.

My thoughts are with Anthoine Hubert, his family, and friends. He was a young talent that was taken too soon.

But that doesn’t ever make the pill easier to swallow.

Scott Masom

photo credit: Anthoine Hubert’s Twitter

 

 

 

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